How get your story back on track… #amwriting #NaNoWriMo

dear-diary-entry-b6687

Welcome to my weekly ‘Diary of a hopeful author.’ This week it’s all about reconnecting to the main message of your story via your plot and thesis…

Ok, so, today, for me, it’s all about two words: thesis and plot. I say these two things because, right now I am facing a very important edit of the second book in my thriller trilogy, working with my, frankly, awesome editor, and something has cropped up, something that is crucial not only to my writing, but all story writing. Yep, it’s the two words I mentioned above. And if you are either editing your work right now, are in the middle of a first draft or simply planning, listen up.

A thesis in a story is what the author is saying about the book summarised in one sentence. For example: crime doesn’t pay, love conquers all etc. My thesis for book two is: The truth will out.  Now, here’s the rub: the thesis is the most vital part of a book and is what holds the attention of an editor and reader throughout the book and beyond. Try this: think of your fave novel – what made it stick in your head for so long? What was it saying to you? That is the thesis talking.

Often, as writers, we focus on the plot and while that’s crucial, it is often done at the detriment of the thesis. I have found, as we all often do, that, in the sea of writing, I forget, sometimes, my thesis, forget to communicate what my book is trying to say. And when that happens, it all goes wobbly.

So what to do? Well, that’s the easy part, because you see, the function of the plot is to communicate the thesis of your book. And that’s it. Do that, and your story will have coherence. Don’t do that, don’t communicate the thesis via the plot and your story will simply be a string of events with minimum significance outside the drama of the narrative you’ve created. This means that when you create a plot development, bear in mind your thesis and only include it if it is underpinning your thesis. If not, it is a piece of bark floating in a sea, unconnected to anything else – and it has to go.

So, today, that’s my advice to you – and to myself. Always check in with your thesis. Ask yourself, ‘What is my book trying to say? Is my plot communicating that thesis to the reader?’ Sometimes you may find you’re on the right track, others, like now with me, you may discover you need to steer the ship back on course. And it doesn’t half feel good when you get on the right route again.

So that’s me, today, steering my writing ship, trying to communicate, through my plot, what on earth my novel is trying to say underneath, between those black and white lines. Simple, right..?

Thanks for reading 🙂 Join in the writing conversation  below…

Advertisements

Hey there! You weren't going to leave without commenting, were you?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s